Friday, January 4, 2013

Paul Revere Eludes the British in Somerville

All around Boston and its surrounding areas one can find markers of America's first revolution. This site looks like a comprehensive community effort to document them.

I found this marker in the parking lot of the Holiday Inn on Washington Street.




It reads:
PAUL REVERE
ON HIS FAMOUS RIDE
APRIL 18 1775 WAS INTERCEPTED
NEAR HERE BY BRITISH OFFICERS
AND ESCAPED.


Painter Fred Lynch tells the story of what happened in his blog post Paul Revere's Ride Revisited: The Gruesome Landmark

Revere writes of what happened in a letter from 1798:

“I set off upon a very good Horse; it was then about 11 o’Clock, and very pleasant. After I had passed Charlestown Neck, and got nearly opposite where Mark was hung in chains, I saw two men on Horse back, under a Tree. When I got near them, I discovered they were British officer. One tryed to git a head of Me, and the other to take me. I turned my Horse very quick, and Galloped towards Charlestown neck, and then pushed for the Medford Road. The one who chased me, endeavoring to Cut me off, got into a Clay pond, near where the new Tavern is now built. I got clear of him, and went thro Medford, over the Bridge, and up to Menotomy.”


Truly you must read on to discover who Mark was. It is no wonder why Fred Lynch calls this The Gruesome Landmark. Today one would never guess such gruesome things happened. It is the site of a brightly painted and cheery Holiday Inn.






Here is the marker in a wider context:




Visited on January 2nd. It was about 9 degrees that day. I popped inside the hotel to warm up after snapping the photos.




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  1. [...] of Paul Revere, there is a lovely statue in Boston’s North End of Revere on his horse. In the background, [...]

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